Documentation

Caddyfile Directives

The following directives come standard with Caddy, and can be used in the HTTP Caddyfile:

Directive Description
acme_server An embedded ACME server
basicauth Enforces HTTP Basic Authentication
bind Customize the server's socket address
encode Encodes (usually compresses) responses
file_server Serve files from disk
handle A mutually-exclusive group of directives
handle_errors Defines routes for handling errors
handle_path Like handle, but strips path prefix
header Sets or removes response headers
import Include snippets or files
log Enables access/request logging
php_fastcgi Serve PHP sites over FastCGI
redir Issues an HTTP redirect to the client
request_header Manipulates request headers
respond Writes a hard-coded response to the client
reverse_proxy A powerful and extensible reverse proxy
rewrite Rewrites the request internally
root Set the path to the site root
route A group of directives treated literally as single unit
templates Execute templates on the response
tls Customize TLS settings
try_files Rewrite that depends on file existence
uri Manipulate the URI

Syntax

The syntax of each directive will look something like this:

directive [<matcher>] <args...> {
	subdirective [<args...>]
}

The <carets> indicate tokens to be substituted by actual values.

The[brackets] indicate optional parameters.

The ellipses ... indicates a continuation, i.e. one or more parameters or lines.

Subdirectives are always optional unless documented otherwise, even though they don't appear in [brackets].

Matchers

Most---but not all---directives accept matcher tokens, which let you filter requests. Matcher tokens are usually optional. If you see this in a directive's syntax:

[<matcher>]

then the directive accepts a matcher token, letting you filter which requests the directive applies to.

Because matcher tokens all work the same, the various possibilities for the matcher token will not be described on every page, to reduce duplication. Instead, refer to the centralized matcher documentation.

Directive order

Many directives manipulate the HTTP handler chain. The order in which those directives are evaluated matters, so a default ordering is hard-coded into Caddy:

root

header

redir
rewrite

uri
try_files

basicauth
request_header
encode
templates

handle
handle_path
route

respond
reverse_proxy
php_fastcgi
file_server
acme_server

You can override/customize this ordering by using the order global option or the route directive.